Tag Archives: X-ray

Patella Fracture

This radiograph of patellas shows a normal left patella and a healing fracture of the right patella.  This x-ray was taken with the patient lying on his back and directing the beam over his bent knees.

Notice that the facet of the patella that articulates with the lateral condyle of the femur is larger than the facet articulating with the medial condyle. 

image courtesy of Radiopaedia.org

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Scoliosis

Scoliosis is a medical condition in which a person’s spine is curved from side to side.

Image from TheScoliosisFoundation.org (source)

Scoliosis is a medical condition in which a person’s spine is curved from side to side.  Although it is a complex three-dimensional deformity, on an X-ray, viewed from the rear, the spine of an individual with scoliosis may look more like an “S” or a “C” than a straight line. Scoliosis is typically classified as either congenital(caused by vertebral anomalies present at birth), idiopathic (cause unknown, subclassified as infantile, juvenile, adolescent, or adult, according to when onset occurred), or neuromuscular (having developed as a secondary symptom of another condition, such as spina bifida, cerebral palsy, spinal muscular atrophy, or physical trauma.

Recent longitudinal studies reveal that the most common form of the condition, late-onset idiopathic scoliosis, is physiologically harmless and self-limiting even without treatment.  The rarer forms of scoliosis pose risks of complications. (from wikipedia)

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Cardiomegaly

Cardiomegaly is a medical condition wherein the heart is enlarged.

This is a chest x-ray of someone with congestive heart failure.

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Pneumopericardium

The heart partially or completely surrounded by air, with the pericardium sharply outlined by air density on either side.
Pneumopericardium can usually be distinguished from pneumomediastinum, since air in the pericardial sac should not rise above the anatomic limits of the pericardial reflexion on the proximal great vascular pedicle. Also on radiographs obtained with the patient in the decubitus position, air in the pericardial sac will shift immediately, while air in the mediastinum will not shift in a short interval between films.
Occasionally, it may not be possible to distinguish pneumopenicardium from pneumomediastinum on plain film. (source wikidoc)

 

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